New map addition for flier

The 2018 Rubicon Area OHV Trails map/flier is hot off the press.

Hopefully, by Saturday afternoon, I’ll get them at the Rubicon trailhead in Tahoma. Once the Middle Fork Trail opens, I’ll post them there as well. The LTBMU is on board and even the TNF has allowed me to put up my map and fliers at the Barker Pass intersection.

So, not a lot of changes but one very important change. I’ve added a better representation of the Rubicon Trail Foundation (RTF) property and the trail to access the property. If you remember, there was a land swap done to allow vehicle access to the RTF property from the Rubicon. So, the RTF property is no longer the traditional rectangle of a half section of land.

Flier map 2018_3_16 (Medium)

Please remember that the RTF property is private property. It must be open for you to drive there. The plan is for the property to be open every weekend this summer but not mid-week.

The trail on the map is an approximation. It should not be used for navigation but rather for the general location of the trail. Please stay on the trail and Tread Lightly!

RTF plans to build a caretaker cabin on the property this summer. That will allow the property to be open all summer in 2019.

For more information on the RTF property, I suggest visiting the RTF website:

www.RubiconTrailFoundation.com

If you have suggestions for future versions of this map or the flier please contact me:

TheOtherRubicon@charter.net

 

Rubicon Ronin

 

 

 


And now for something completely different…

Ok, not completely different but not directly Rubicon related.

Last September, the Hi-Lo’s ran the Barrett Lake Trail. I was lucky enough to make the trip. My passenger took the time to take a few videos. Here is one of them from the trip out…

It was a two day, one night trip. For the most part, the weather was good. Sunny skies with warm but not hot temperatures. The afternoon and evening brought a change of conditions. The wind picked up and setting up camp became a challenge.

The area, both the entrance of the trail and at Barrett Lake, was littered with downed trees from a wind storm the previous winter. It didn’t make for a settling night know that trees could get blown over.

I made sure to weight down my tent as soon as I put it up. But the next morning, with the wind still blowing a little, I forgot to keep something in the tent and as I loaded my sleeping bag and pad in to the Jeep, the tent blew away.

After getting the tent set up that first afternoon, we did the short hike up Tells Peak to see the B-17 aircraft wreckage. (Google it.) Very cool. Not a difficult hike but you should remember you’re at an elevation higher than you’re used to.

The trip out revealed a broken U-bolt, missing motor mount bolt and loose cross member bolt. After a short repair session, the rest of the trail was smooth sailing. At least until we got to the ‘gatekeeper’ and one of our rigs broke a pitman arm 50′ from the gate and pavement.

This is a great trail. It opens late in the season due to the area staying wetter than the surrounding forest. And my close early due to wet weather.

 

Rubicon Ronin


RTF property access finalized

So it doesn’t really affect the Tahoe side but it’s important Rubicon news. RTF has finalized legal wheeled access to its property along the Rubicon Trail. The RTF half section is due west of the Rubicon Springs property.

rtfpropertygoogleearth

 

News release from RTF:

RUBICON TRAIL FOUNDATION

Contact: Rusty Folena FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Telephone: 1-888-678-2426

E-mail: President@RubiconTrailFoundation.org

Placerville, CA

December 1st 2016

Rubicon Trail Foundation Property Access

I would like to announce that the Rubicon Trail Foundation and Rubicon Trail Partnership have reached an agreement to access the Rubicon Trail Foundation parcel of land. We have recorded a Boundary Line Adjustment with Rubicon Trail Partnership which will give us two benefits one is access to our nearly land, and the other one is that we will own a quarter mile of land underlying the most famous trail in the world the Rubicon Trail. The Rubicon Trail Foundation would like to thank The Rubicon Trail Partnership for working with us to make this happen. There will be some great opportunities for public access to camp, explore and to enjoy he Rubicon Trail

Stay tuned for more news about what the plan is to access the property. We will have an “Open House” after the snow melts. Follow us on FaceBook and our website link to the Property Page http://www.rubicontrail.org/rtf-property.htm. Hundreds of hours of volunteer work has been done already to help with access to the property. There is more work to be done for sure. The master plan will be released soon, so please stay tuned.

Thank You

Rusty Folena

The Rubicon Trail Foundation (RTF) was formed in 2004. We are a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation dedicated to the future health of the Rubicon Trail and our mission is to enhance the future health and use of the Rubicon Trail, while ensuring responsible motorized year-round trail access. FOTR (Friends of the Rubicon) and RTF works with individuals, 4×4 clubs, organizations, and agencies to maintain and manage the trail. Our Officers and Directors represent a wide variety of Rubicon Trail OHV users, land owners, county representatives, manufacturers, and event organizers.

If you would like to help with our efforts, you may send your tax deductible donations to:

Rubicon Trail Foundation PO Box 2188 Placerville, CA 95667 Paypal donations or major credit cards by calling 888-6rubicon or by signing up for a Friends of the Rubicon work party at: http://www.friendsoftherubicon.com

More information is available at http://www.RubiconTrailFoundation.org To schedule an interview with a representative of the Rubicon Trail Foundation, please e-mail president@RubiconTrailFoundation.org

The map below is virtually the same as above but outlines the parcel west (left) of the RTF parcel, highlighted. You can only imagine that the RTP owners gave up the furthest south 1/4 mile of the Rubicon to RTF. Without any knowledge of what actually happened, I’m going to guess RTF got the trail from the split at the Old True Sluice and the Indian Slabs to the southern RTP property line. And some of the property east of the trail in order to access the RTF property.

No doubt, RTF traded some of their property to RTP for this access.

rtfparcel

Great to see this settled.

 

Rubicon Ronin

 


Kaspian campground

This campground is even a little more formal than Blackwood. You get cleaner pit toilets, parking on asphalt and a view of Lake Tahoe. But there is a catch, you must pay. These campsite can be reserved so call ahead.

dscn0584

dscn0585

And you must obey…

dscn0586

If that didn’t scare you off, the entrance is right off highway 89 at the entrance to Blackwood Canyon and forest road 03:

dscn0575

Plenty of FS rules, notices and instructions:

dscn0576

Nicer pit toilets as there is a camp host who lives in his RV in the parking lot all summer long.

dscn0578

It’s a bit of a hike to get to some of the campsites. And there not much separating you from your neighbors.

dscn0579

Did I mention a view of Lake Tahoe? It’s a “filtered” view.

dscn0580dscn0581dscn0582

There is a trade off between a great lake view and a little more road noise.

dscn0583

Just in case you’re interested, the FS is looking for help in the form of campground host.

The guy working there this summer says he splits his time between Kaspian and the Meeks Bay campground. He travels a lot and doesn’t work the same area two summers in a row. It could be a great retirement gig and a great way to see the country.

dscn0587

 

Rubicon Ronin

 


Blackwood campground

For a more formal (minimally) camping experience in the Rubicon area, one of my suggestions is the Blackwood Campground. To get there, drive two miles up Blackwood Canyon on the paved forest road 03, then keep right on to forest road (trail) 15N38, the Middle Fork Trail. The first section of the trail to the camp area is a flat dirt road. Okay, it has a few low rollers and too many potholes, but a motorhome could get there.

20160811_084547_resized

This is a designated camp area so you are only allowed to put up a tent and stay over night in one of the six designated campsites. It’s a first come, first serve, no reservation area. There are two pit toilets and plenty of parking for large groups. Although the FS only allows six people per campsite per this sign posted at Blackwood but bearing the name of “Luther Pass”:

dscn0574

There is a large day use meeting/cooking area. Please check fire restrictions before using the BBQ. It would be a great place to have a group meet up as an alternative to the Rubicon staging area.

dscn0564

The campground map:

dscn0570

The pit toilets and ample parking.

dscn0569

Photos of the campsites, some are in the trees more than others. Bear boxes, fire pit with grill and a picnic bench are provided in each site.

dscn0565dscn0566dscn0567dscn0568dscn0571dscn0572dscn0573

Now the signs don’t say anything about parking regulations. So here’s a thought, if the Rubicon staging area is full, park here and either drive the highway down to the Rubicon or if you’re in a green sticker vehicle, drive the LONG drive on forest road 03 over to the Rubicon. It’s probably 15 miles.

You could take 15N38 (Middle Fork) to the summit, then 16E79 (Upper Barker Meadow) to 03, then drop down 16E76 (Lower Barker Meadow) to the Rubicon. Lower Barker Meadow OHV Route is a kick in the pants. If you haven’t done it, check it out. You will never hold the steering wheel straight.

 

Rubicon Ronin