Tahoe side points of interest

Both Placer County and the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) are looking for a list of Tahoe side points of interest along the east half of the trail within Placer County.

The LTBMU is putting together a new map for the staging area and would like to add these points. I think Placer wants them for a map for their website.

Here is what I have so far, please let me know what I’ve missed or if you call any of these by a different name:

Highway 89

Entrance @ Residential

Quad Rental Parking

FS 14N34: Noonchester Mine Road

Overflow/size Parking

Bridge (Car Wash)

Staging Area

Gatekeeper (sort-of)

FS 14N40: Buck Lake Trail

TNF/LTBMU boundary

FS 3102-26 (turnout)

Adopt-A-Campsite: Elevated

Adopt-A-Campsite: Snag

FS 3102-24 (Campsites across from Miller Lake)

Boat Ramp

FS 3102-22 (Campsite on west end of Miller)

14N39: Richardson Lake Trail

The Pond

FS 03-04-12-05: Ellis Peak Trail

FS 03-04: road to Barker Pass

Pacific Crest Trail

Bottom Dollar Hole

Potato Patch

Old Water Hole (filled)

FS 16E76: Barker Meadow OHV Trail (lower)

Hummer Bend

Helicopter Flat / Birthday Cake (the mountain in the distance)

FS 16E77: Bear Camp

FS 16E78: Observation Point

Trees Section

Creek Crossing (with log water bar)

Upper Hairpin

Morris Rock (The Steps)

The Notch (Squeeze Rock)

U-Rock (Formally V-Rock)

The Cadillac (over the side of the trail)

S-Turn

Lower Hairpin

Roots & Rocks Section

Granite Outcropping – alternate route

The Driveway

The Graves

FS 16E12: Long Lake Trail

Miller Creek

County Line

 


RTF finally puts out a newsletter

For literally three years, I been asking for some kind of documentation of what RTF does: agendas for their meetings, minutes from their meetings, an outline of what was discussed or even a quarterly statement of what they’ve done, what they’re working on and what their next project will be.

Three different directors had promised to make this happen over the years but nothing ever came of it. Well, here it is…


What’s New on the Trail?

We at RTF have been threatening to put out a newsletter on a quarterly basis for a while, and this is our first edition.  We hope it reminds you how much we all love the Trail, informs you about things that are going on out there, and lets you know what RTF is doing.   Here we go…

 Merlin Scott and John Pardi Announce Retirement

john_pardi
 merlin_scott

After many years serving the Foundation and the public on the trail doing educational work, Merlin and John have announced that they will both retire after this season.  Merlin wants to spend more time at home and has a bucket list of travels he wants to take.  John has said he wants to pay more attention to projects at home and his Land Cruiser parts business.  Both have told us that they have great memories of their years of work on the trail, and that moving on was a difficult decision to make.

We will miss them both, and have a difficult time filling their shoes.

Trail Projects

Each update we will update status on projects recently completed and those upcoming.  This has been a whirlwind year.  Shannon Chard, in her first year as Trail Boss, has really set a pace.

Helicopter Project

Using grant funds from the California Office of Off Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR), El Dorado County contracted with Siller Brothers to provide 25 hours of flight time doing work such as moving rock, hauling material in for the Rubicon Green Bridge rebuild project, and placing a bathroom at Buck Island.  This all took place in May, when the weather wasn’t so great…the project was visited by rain, snow, lightning, and even a little bit of sunshine.

Winter Camp

As many are aware, the trail at Winter Camp has been a problem for Winter Closures for several years.  The rock work done by DOT in 2010 had been swallowed up by the sandy roadbed, leaving a hole that consistently has deeper water that has triggered a closure.  In a carefully coordinated effort, FOTR volunteers placed chain link on the sand to form a grid that should keep the rock from sinking again.  As soon as the grid was placed, approximately 60 yards of rock was put on top of it.  Within a few days, Forest Hill Fourwheelers came through and spread the rock to completely cover the grid.  This effort will harden the trail surface and prevent winter closures from this spot for years to come.

Soup Bowl

This project will be undertaken on October 15th.  That’s late in the season, but it’s been a busy year!  In the last several years, El Dorado County has embraced a philosophy of “keeping the hard line hard (and hardened) and keeping the easy line easy”.  At this point, Rubicon is by no means the most difficult trail around, but it is still enjoyed for its challenges. That means we want to keep the difficult lines so that those who want to, have that challenge.  At the same time, not everyone wants that much challenge, or is up to it.  That’s why keeping the “easy line easy” is important; to keep folks with smaller rigs or less experience from digging holes, driving off trail, or widening the trail in order to get past hard spots.  Soup is a perfect example of this philosophy.  The hard line on the left is all hardened (nothing but granite) so that it doesn’t cause silt to enter the drainages, and the easy line on the right needs to be kept easy and erosion free.

That’s what this project is about.  Each year the sandy area at the bottom of the easy line fills with soil, and each year it gets dug out by wheelspin by the end of the season.  That soil drains toward Winter Camp and eventually into streams, rivers, and lakes.  When the Water Board Cleanup and Abatement Order was rescinded, El Dorado County made a commitment to continue to recognize and mitigate problems like this, and RTF supports that effort while keeping the trail open and challenging.  This project will add a concrete footing to the easy line to prevent wheelspin and erosion.

Rubicon Bridge

 rubicon_bridge_repair

The bridge at Rubicon Springs has existed in many forms over the years.  Up until 1937 it was a user constructed log bridge that washed out and had to be rebuilt often.  In 1937, the County erected a proper wood bridge that washed out sometime in the mid-forties.  Then in 1947, the County raised the abutments and placed the existing green steel bridge structure with a wood deck.  It has been rebuilt several times, mostly by volunteers; in 1962, in 1978, in 1991 and in 1996-1997.  Of late it hasn’t looked so great…the approaches were too small for modern rigs and were eroding, the stringers that hold the deck up were rotting on the ends, and the runners were all but gone.

In a cooperative effort between El Dorado County, FOTR, Jeepers Jamboree, and RTF, the bridge was stripped to the metal frame and all the wood was replaced by larger pressure treated timbers and extended wing walls were poured to improve safety on the bridge approaches and prevent further damage.  This was an amazing volunteer effort that spanned months in planning and totaled up hundreds of hours of work in just a few days to get it done.  Special thanks to the Hi-Landers club, and especially to Bill Eister, the wood crew leader, and Wayne Lippert, the concrete crew leader.  Without their expertise and hard work, it would not have happened.

Black Tie and Boots

Save the date for Black Tie and Boots, it’s Saturday, March 11th, 2017.  We hope to see you all there!  If you would like to be sent an invitation or would like more information please contact us at chris.cowan@rubicontrailfoundation.org.

Cantina

RTF’s 12th Annual Cantina for the ‘Con, held at the Loon Lake Spillway over Labor Day weekend was a huge success.  A giant raffle, fantastic prizes, great tacos, and good times…what’s not to like!  Over $40,000 was raised to support efforts on the Rubicon Trail.  Thanks to all our supporters, vendors and attendees, who donated, bought tickets, and enjoyed tacos.

Elections

At our December 14th, 2016 meeting, the Rubicon Trail Foundation will hold regular elections. There will be a total of six seats available, five of which are held by sitting directors that are re-running for their seat.  The remaining seat was held by an individual that has decided not to run again.  Anyone who is interested in serving on the board should contact the president, Sean Russell at 530-417-0031 or sean.russell@RubiconTrailFoundation.org.

 Rubicon Trail Foundation

 PO Box 2188

 Placerville, CA  95667

 www.rubicontrailfoundation.org


 

 

So some interesting things to note:

  • None of the trail projects noted are on the Tahoe side.
  • There is no mention of RTF accomplishments
  • There is no mention of current RTF projects
  • There is no mention of what RTF plans to take on moving forward

Not the newsletter I was hoping for, maybe they will read this and put out a better newsletter next time.

 

Rubicon Ronin


User input on Rubicon maintenance

I just sent a letter to the president and vice president of the Rubicon Trail Foundation (RTF) asking that they keep the users informed of any maintenance efforts by either county PRIOR to any decision being made so the users can comment on these efforts.

Some maintenance efforts are being done that have nothing to do with safety or water quality. It’s all about making the trail easier in certain places so some people don’t put a scrape on their rig.

 

Sean Russel
John Arenz
Rubicon Trail Foundation

September 27, 2016

Sean & John,

I am writing to ask that RTF keep the users of the Rubicon Trail informed of any maintenance efforts prior to the work being approved in order for the users to be able to comment on these efforts.

There are past examples of work done that was neither a safety issue nor a water quality issue. There is one effort planned, but not yet performed, that does not fall within either of those categories.

By creating a new page on your website of proposed, current and completed Rubicon Trail maintenance and which agency is leading it and how the public can comment on those issues, the users would be informed and would have the ability to comment on how our trail is managed.

Rogue maintenance is also an issue. RTF should develop professional relations with all organizations that may have or might perform such maintenance without agency approval and discourage such actions.

Too many decisions are being made behind closed doors or without users’ approval or input. Some of this is on us for not attending meetings but most users work M-F and can’t attend these meetings. So, again I am asking that RTF attend those meeting on our behalf and to keep us informed.

I will be starting a thread on www.Pirate4x4.com to allow Rubicon Trail users comment on this idea. I ask that you join in on the conversation.

Thank you,

Doug Barr
www.TheOtherRubicon.com

I’ve also started a thread on Pirate4x4 to allow the public to weigh in with their thoughts. Please feel free to follow and/or comment on the issue.

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/rubicon-trail/2403146-who-decides.html#post38371266

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cadillac Hill bypass blocked

Author’s note: I was going to hold off on this just to space out my posts but a conversation  online just now made me decide to post it. For the record, I don’t alter the trail. I repair the trail. My work is pre-approved by the Tahoe National Forest or involves getting water off or across the trail in order to minimize erosion. (Also pre-approved; generally not specifically.)

Unfortunately, there are those out there that alter the trail for their own personal gain, either making the trail easier or making the trail harder. Some are trying to do good work but skip too many steps and the work doesn’t last and sometimes hurts.

In order for keep our trails open, safe and maintained properly, we must all speak up when our opinions are being asked. We should volunteer when we can. Comment on grants, attend your local FS meetings, join organizations that fight for your ‘pursuit of happiness’!   Rant Off.

 

A new illegal bypass has appeared on Cadillac Hill this summer. I don’t know when it appeared or who started it but it’s not the first of it’s kind. Not twenty yards from this one was a previous attempt to bypass the trail around a difficult section.

You can see the ‘new’ bypass looking straight in to the photo. The top of the old bypass is in front of the bumper of the Jeep on the right side of the photo.

dscn0589

I get that people are tired and sometimes broken when they are driving out, but that doesn’t mean you are allowed to make an easier route. Please stay on the trail.

The bypass was blocked by moving a rather large log to block the route.

dscn0590

Both ends of the log were drilled and rebar was placed to prevent the removal of the log. I know this will not prevent those who really want to remove it from removing it but they will have to work at it and they will know they are doing something wrong.

dscn0591

dscn0593

Signs were placed on both sides of the log to let people know that this is the will of the forest service, not an individual.

dscn0592

Not wanting to hide from the work I perform under the guidance of the forest service, I put the logo of this website on the sign along with the USFS logo and the CA State Parks logo because they mange and fund respectively a large portion of the maintenance of our OHV trails.

We are our own worst enemy sometimes. Driving off trail and creating new route just gives the anti-OHV people more ammunition to use against us and to close our trails.

We need to work together. There are those who illegally modify the trail to make it harder and there are those who illegally drive off trail to find an easier route. We need to find a middle ground.

If you would like to discuss this issue further, please email me TheOtherRubicon@Charter.net.

 

Rubicon Ronin


Open letter to Jeep/Chrysler

This is an open letter to the Jeep/Chrysler Corporation regarding the recent running of the Rubicon Trail by the newest Trailhawk, the “Trail Rated” badge Jeep has been using for years and their lack of support to the Rubicon Trail and those who work so hard to keep it open and accessible year round for all types of users:

 

Chrysler Corporation
1000 Chrysler Drive
Auburn Hills, Michigan
48326

September 17, 2016

 

Hey Chrysler,

The story goes that Jeep drove two brand new, absolutely stock, Grand Cherokee Trailhawks through the world famous Rubicon Trail this past summer:
http://expeditionportal.com/jeep-grand-cherokee-trailhawk-edition-tackles-the-rubicon/

What an accomplishment! I only wish I had a Subaru Forester handy to follow you down the trail to show how easy your crew made the trail. As rumor has it, you had a bunch of professional Jeepers Jamboree ‘rock rollers’ ensuring that the Cherokee never had more than a four inch obstacle in its path.

Having been involved in Rubicon trail maintenance for more than 15 years, this year I noticed a change in the east end of the Rubicon Trail, specifically Cadillac Hill, after your Grand Cherokees drove the trail. In my 31 years of Jeep ownership and experience on Cadillac Hill, I’ve never experienced Cadillac Hill so easy.

Now, I understand that some rock stacking takes place during a trip through the Rubicon Trail. I even threw a few rocks for myself on the Fordyce Trail this summer during Sierra Trek. But when your crew literally throws the larger rocks off the trail and over the cliff that changes the trail for everyone forever as those rocks are never going to be replaced.

It’s sad enough that Jeep has used the Rubicon name for years and has never done anything to support the maintenance efforts on the Rubicon Trail. But the complete opposite has now happened; you came to the Rubicon Trail and literally paved it for an advertisement plug and walked away from any responsibility of not having followed the time honored and respected motto of Tread Lightly!

As far as I’m concerned, you have lost credibility in the OHV world with your vehicle, by your actions on the Rubicon Trail and your inactions in regards to maintaining the Rubicon Trail.

Would you like to see Jeep as an actual player in the OHV world? Would you like to see current OHV users talk positively of the Jeep/Chrysler Corporation? Would you like to start Jeep back on a path to the glory days that Bantam and Willys started? Yes? Good! Here’s some advice:

Work with the clubs, groups, organizations, individuals and agencies that have been working for decades to ensure year round access to the Rubicon Trail for all types of OHV users.

Build a model without the wood insets and automatic climate controls and with a solid front axle under it, even if it’s just a limited run of a special “Rubicon” edition with $1000 of each sale going to the maintenance and future preservation of the Rubicon Trail.

If you aren’t willing to make those changes, contract a ‘builder’ in the Reno or Sacramento area to build 500 Rubicon Editions by taking a stock Grand Cherokee and letting the builder modify the vehicle to really make it honestly “Trail Rated” with a solid front axle, lift kit, larger tires, etc. Detroit did a lot of this back in the 60’s and 70’s with muscle cars. Again, I would expect a donation with the sale of each vehicle to go to the Rubicon Trail.

Bottom line, it’s time Jeep steps up and does something to payback for what Jeep has benefitted from regarding the Rubicon Trail and those who built, drove and loved the Jeep product for decades.

 

Doug Barr

www.TheOtherRubicon.com
Currently owned Jeeps: ’85 CJ-7, ’84 CJ-7, ’47 CJ-2A
Previously owned Jeeps: ’87 Wrangler, ’52 Willys PU, ’83 CJ-5, ’89 Cherokee, ’98 Cherokee