Major snow dump in the Sierras

We just got through a series of major storms. Honestly, the biggest of the season. The summits got more than six feet of snow. The Homewood Mountain Resort claims about five feet over the last the last week. That means the Rubicon is buried.

So, I drove past Monday (March 5th) and took a few pictures of the entrance. I was up there just before the storms and took some to compare:

Last Monday the 26th: really no berm to speak of…

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Again, this was before the storm just 100 yards up the trail:

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After the latest storms: now the neighborhood probably got two feet of snow but notice the snow is piled higher than my six foot tall truck.

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Compare that to berms around the neighborhood, maybe three feet tall. I have already sent an email to Placer County letting them know this is unacceptable (dumping snow on a county right of way) and that although the County probably didn’t do it, they need to remove it as they would a load of rock dropped on any county road. Don’t hold your breath.

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Looking over the berm, where no motor vehicle has driven, yet; it looks like a good place for a fun day of snow play.

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The berm will need to be taken down. Right now you could get a quad or snowmobile through the slot but not much else.

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Let me get on my safety soap box…

I can’t say it enough but travel prepared. Figure something will go wrong and you have to spend the night, or two. Have food, water, clothing and shelter for multiple people and many nights.

Believe it or not, some people still don’t get it.

Rig near Miller 1

(Photo stolen from a post on Pirate4x4 by “The Fixxer”.)

This rig has been stuck on the trail for a few weeks now. It’s just east of Miller Lake at the water hole. There was room to go around but not much. Now think about this with 4-5 feet of snow burying it.

You might be wheeling along just fine and not realize the rig is underneath you. Honestly, it’s probably still visible but there is a greater chance of sliding in to it if you try and go around.

Some fellow Hi-Lo’s are reaching out to the authorities and the owner to see if we can help get the rig out or at least off to the side for the safe passage of others.

I’ll keep you posted.

 

Rubicon Ronin

 

 

 


Post Winter Hazards

It’s been a long winter. We all want to get out on our trails. Feel free to do so but travel with caution. Although the trail below looks inviting, look closer at the tree across the trail 100 yards out.

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The picture below is why I really stopped here. This is the Middle Fork Trail up Blackwood Canyon. It parallels the paved Forest road 03 to Barker Pass. I’ve actually asked the FS to close the trail until repairs can be done.

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My fear is someone not paying attention, more likely at night, might drive off the road,

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Back to the pictured tree across the trail. There is evidence that people are going off trail to get around the tree. My motto: “Turn Around, Don’t Go Around”. If you come across such an obstacle, use your winch or a strap to clear the problem. If you can’t stay on the trail and clear the obstacle, turn around.

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On upper Barker Pass Road, there is still a little snow wheeling to be done.

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I didn’t take picture of all the downed trees I came across. Most were smaller or not blocking the entire trail. On a motorcycle, it’s much easier to get around a tree in the trail without doing resource damage.

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There are plans in the works to get out to all the side trails off the Rubicon to clear the obstacles. We’ll leave the snow for you though.

 

Rubicon Ronin


LTBMU grant comments are in

The public has spoken regarding the proposed grant requested by the LTBMU. In short, the public does not support a grant that does not support four wheel drive trails. Specifically, the public does not support mountain bike trail maintenance with OHV funds.

Here is a link to the comments on the LTBMU grant request: http://ohv.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=28161

Most of the comments are from South Tahoe locals who either drive Twin Peaks or ride the Sand Pits. These locals not only use our public lands for OHV enjoyment but they also step up and volunteer to maintain these areas. Both the Lake Tahoe Hi-Lo’s and STORM (South Tahoe Off Road Motorcycle club) members took the time to comment. Thank you to everyone that commented.

Hopefully, the LTBMU will read and act on the comments and include 4wd trails and the Sand Pits in a rewrite of the grant proposal.

This is how the process is supposed to work. Let’s hope it continues to work.