The Tahoma Market is down for repairs

As I was riving down the west shore the other day, I notice a HUGE fence around the Tahoma Market in Tahoma.

I asked a worker about what was going on and when the store would reopen. He said he didn’t know the actual date for the reopening but they were hoping the end of the month.

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Well, it looks more likely the end of the year with all the walls they’ve torn apart.

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Hopefully they will be back selling their awesome sandwiches very soon.

 

Rubicon Ronin

 


More on prescribed burns…

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This is a photo looking northwest from Meeks Bay. The Smoke is coming from the west end of Sugar Pine State Park. I didn’t stop to take the more dramatic picture as I was travelling south on 89.

Here is the email I received because I subscribe to the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit’s prescribed burn email notifications…

 

PRESS RELEASE

Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team

October 17, 2018 For Immediate Release

Prescribed fire operations today on Tahoe’s West and South Shores

Contact: U.S. Forest Service, Lisa Herron (530) 543-2815

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. – Weather and conditions permitting, California State Parks and the U.S. Forest Service may conduct prescribed fire operations in Sugar Pine Point State Park on the West Shore and near Twin Peaks on the South Shore beginning today, October 17, 2018. Smoke will likely be present. A map with project locations and details is available for viewing at http://www.tahoefft.org. To receive prescribed fire notifications, send an email to pa_ltbmu@fs.fed.us.

Prescribed fire operations are conducted whenever conditions allow to reduce excess vegetation that can feed unwanted wildfires. Planned fires now reduce the threat of unplanned fires later, which helps provide increased community protection. Fire is a natural process in the Sierra Nevada and helps keep our forests healthy by minimizing the spread of insects and disease, recycling nutrients back into the soil and promoting improved habitat for diverse vegetation and wildlife.

Fall and winter bring cooler temperatures and precipitation, which are ideal for conducting prescribed fire operations. Each operation follows a specialized burn plan, which considers temperature, humidity, wind, moisture of the vegetation, and conditions for the dispersal of smoke. This information is used to decide when and where to burn.

Smoke from prescribed fire operations is normal and may continue for several days after an ignition depending on the project size and environmental conditions. Prescribed fire smoke is generally less intense and of much shorter duration than smoke produced by unwanted wildland fires.

Agencies coordinate closely with local county and state air pollution control districts and monitor weather conditions carefully prior to prescribed fire ignitions. They wait for favorable conditions that will carry smoke up and disperse it away from smoke sensitive areas. Crews also conduct test burns before igniting a larger area, to verify how effectively materials are consumed and how smoke will travel.

Before prescribed fire operations are conducted, agencies post road signs around areas affected by prescribed fire, send email notifications and update the local fire information line maintained by the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit at 530-543-2816. The Tahoe Fire and Fuels Team gives as much advance notice as possible before burning, but some operations may be conducted on short notice due to the small window of opportunity for conducting these operations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prescribed Fires have Started

Fall brings cooler temperatures, changing colors and prescribed burns by the forest service.

Some of those fires are happening right now on 125 acres of federal and state land near the Rubicon Trail. Mostly, well south of the trail.

Here is a link to the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit about the projects:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ltbmu/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD599074

Prescribed map

“C” is Sugar Pine State Park – 54 acres

“E” is El Dorado County piles – 6 acres

“A” is DL Bliss State Park – 65

Just an FYI if you’re headed near the trail in the next few weeks.

 

Rubicon Ronin

 

 

 

 


OHV Swap Meet this Saturday, Sparks

The Nevada 4 Wheel Drive Association is hosting another OHV Swap Meet at 4 Wheel Parts on Sparks on Saturday, 8am-1pm.

The last one went well…

https://theotherrubicon.com/?s=swap+meet

Spots are free but limited to two parking spots.

Bring your stuff or bring cash.


Fire Prevention on the Rubicon Trail

I want to start by apologizing for the course language later in this posting. But it’s not my language. I have decided to re-post a very good friend’s blog about the current fire south of Elko Nevada, in the Ruby Mountains, specifically, Lamoile Canyon.

Although this is not directly related to the Rubicon Trail, and I hope it NEVER will be, we need to keep it in mind. We’ve had some close calls with fire this summer but the Forest Service stepped up with air drops and close calls and took care of the fires very quickly. The fires I’m speaking of took place near Ellis Peak. I do not know the cause of those fires.

The blog below is in reference to using firearms outside, and inside, a local gun range. I think that along the Rubicon firearms are not really an issue. Two thoughts though: we do have the possible danger of campfires, welding or disabled vehicles starting a fire and if you read the blog below and think of some of the irresponsible things some OHV users do, it’s similar story.

Not that I am not advocating anyone of you go out and play law cop, unless you have law enforcement training and then I’m begging you to go out and play cop. I am asking that you play firefighter if you come across an abandon camp fire. That, I think we all would do. But when a fire is attended and it’s out of season, please approach cautiously and respectfully request they put the fire out, while explaining the current fire restrictions and the dangers of open fires. 

The temperatures are dropping. The temptation to have a camp fire is growing. Sometime in the future the fire restrictions will be removed. I’m asking that this fall, we all abstain from having camp fires. This summer has seen a lack of rainfall, so the forests are alarmingly dry. 

I’m suggesting that the risk is not worth the reward. We all have propane stoves to cook on; we all have layers of warm clothing to keep us warm; the clear skies (if they are clear) are more beautiful to look at than the fire.

Please read the blog below and pray this never happens to the Rubicon. Let’s be fire safe this fall!

 

Rubicon Ronin

 

 https://rubymountaintrails.blogspot.com/2018/10/black-is-color-of-my-heart-today.html

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Black is the color of my heart today

Lamoille Canyon burned.  This photo is from around 3:30 PM, September 30, 2018.

The canyon was sacrificed to stupidity. To people who didn’t have the common sense to put a rifle range someplace where a fire could be contained, and to close it down – or at least staff it – during extreme fire danger. To people who ignored another, smaller, fire started by shooters using the range a couple of years ago, who ignored another, smaller fire just west of the range a couple of weeks ago.

To people who ignored red flag after red flag after red flag.

The people who started the fire were the apex of a huge heap of people making stupid, selfish decisions all based on their BY GOD given rights TO SHOOT THEIR FUCKING GUNS ANYWHERE AND ANYWHEN THEY BY GOD FEEL LIKE IT.  High winds and extreme fire conditions be damned.  And reality be damned, too – it’s been amply demonstrated that many, many people in this area aren’t at all responsible when it comes to firearm ownership and use. People who consider themselves responsible firearm owners have a responsibility to face the FACT that a large percentage of people who own guns AREN’T responsible.  DON’T make good decisions.  Since our Constitution says that any Tom, Dick and Harry can buy a gun, responsible gun owners need to be responsible enough to establish and maintain boundaries that safeguard the rest of us from these asshats’ complete fucking stupidity.

The Second Amendment crowd goes on and on about onerous firearm regulation.  Bullshit.  I fail to see the regulation, here.  Whoever started this fire likely bought their gun legally by flashing a drivers license and passing a laughable joke of a background check.  There was no requirement for education, no requirement for the most rudimentary demonstration of skills and knowledge.  No requirement that this idiot show that he knew enough to not be out there shooting in high wind in dry grass on a red-flag fire condition day.  On a day when we hadn’t had rain in months.

Spring Creek Association posted a few rules for their rifle range, assuming these idiots would read and follow them.  Well, guys, they didn’t.  And that, my friends, was entirely predictable.  As were the consequences.

Lamoille Canyon burned.

Road at the mouth of the canyon.  The Secret-Lamoille trailhead area burned, as did the remains of the historic flume.  Firefighters saved Ruby Dome Ranch… the fire burned down to the corrals where cowboys were scrambling to finish the work they’d started early in the day before the fire overwhelmed them.
Right Fork Canyon
The access point for Terminal Cancer Couloir.
Scout Camp, including the ruins of the lodge built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression.

The canyon road will be closed through November 30th.  The Spring Creek Rifle Range and Campground are closed until further notice.  That means access to the following trails is closed:  Secret-Lamoille Trail, the Ruby Crest Trail (Lamoille Canyon trailhead), Island Lake Trail, Right Fork Trail, Thomas Canyon Trail, Hennen Canyon Trail (accessing Griswold Lake and Ruby Dome), Seitz Lake Trail.